Rediscovering colonial Bengal’s Muslim women writers


Muslim women writers in Bengali were reasonably prolific in colonial Bengal. However, contemporary readers of Bengali literature are unaware of their work in both fiction and non-fiction. How is it that the writing of an entire demographic has failed to become institutionalised in the widely-researched field of Bangla sahityer itihas or Bengali literary history?

This is the primary question that drives my PhD programme at the IITB-Monash Research Academy. As a corollary, I also ask how we may disinherit the priorities that created these exclusions, and suggest productive paradigms through which colonial Bengal’s Muslim women writers can be read in the twenty-first century.

To begin with, we will need to go back in time a little.

The Bengali literary canon revolves largely around the work of Hindu male writers. Yes, Muslim male writers find mention in certain titles of Bengali literary history by male Muslim historians, but the only Bengali Muslim woman writer whose work has been recognised to some extent is Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain.

This is not to say that Hindu and Brahmo women writers are institutionalised to any recognizable extent within the field of Bangla sahityer itihas either. However, the work of such women writers has been brought to the forefront by a dedicated group of feminist literary scholars working within a field that can be described as early Bengali women’s writing. These scholars have mined the writing of Hindu and Brahmo women writers from colonial Bengal to examine the ways in which Bengali women’s subject hood was produced within the anti-colonial nationalist narrative.

The work of the Muslim women writers that I work on do not fit into these existing paradigms of scholarship. I, therefore, work at the intersection of Bangla sahityer itihas and early Bengali women’s writing to examine how canons are formed and how canonical exclusion operates.

Some of the questions that have dogged me for long are:

– Who is to say what is ‘good’ literature?
– Who is heard when they speak along these lines?
– Who are the gatekeepers of the Bengali literary sphere and how do they operate?

My work focuses on the specific case of colonial Bengal’s Muslim women writers to answer questions that are fundamental to the field of literary study in any language.

Shamsunnahar Mahmud

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

 

My research relies on two key methodical aspects among others—archival research and translation. During the summer of 2017, I discovered the work of the Muslim women writers I have chosen to focus on in five libraries in and around Kolkata. More work by such women writers exist in libraries in Dhaka. However, these works are not yet catalogued under a label such as ‘colonial Bengali Muslim women’s writing.’ So my work in the archives will help to carve out such a category and will create a repository of works fitting such a description. The work of future researchers can further enrich this inaugural repository.

All my primary material is in Bengali. This consists of eight texts ranging between the length of 60 and 400 pages. I have translated all this material into English and will be publishing some of them soon. As a result, this material will be made available to a much larger reading public than such work has commanded ever before. Hopefully, English-language translations of these works will also generate more research interest in the field of Bengali Muslim women’s writing.

Literary canons are built through deliberate exclusion of the writing of people on the periphery. Canon-making is neither unconscious, nor neutral. The onus is on readers to recognize this, learn about the systems of representation and circulation that its biases and omissions indicate, and remedy it as best they can.
Feminists and representatives of religious, caste-based, racial and sexual minorities have, in the last few decades, called for revision of literary canons to include previously undiscovered, but prolific and insightful, writers. However, as a prerequisite to this task, it is necessary to map the exclusionary gestures through which such canons operate and to question whether it would be better to expand canons, revise them, or abjure the idea of canons altogether. My work will hopefully go some way in answering such questions.
As graduate research scholars of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, we study for a dually-badged PhD from IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich our research experience. The Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen academic relationships between the two countries.

Research scholar: Sreejata Paul, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Gender and public sphere

Supervisors: Dr Paulomi Chakraborty and Dr Mridula Nath Chakraborty

Contact details: sreejatapaul@gmail.com

The above story was written by Sreejata Paul. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

How internal friction affects polymer dynamics


Imagine that you are waiting underneath an umbrella at an uncovered bus-stop on a stormy, rainy evening. As the bus rolls into position, you try to fold the umbrella before boarding. The wind and rain make it difficult to do so, and you can feel the driver staring at you impatiently. As the wind slows down a jot, you realize that your umbrella is rusty, making the task of folding it even more difficult. You finally manage to fold the umbrella, amid the increasing number of cold stares from the bus, and slump gratefully in the seat closest to the entrance.

Such a resistance to folding is experienced by all protein molecules which have to fold correctly into their correct 3-D shape, starting from their respective 1-D structures.

When protein molecules are synthesized by RNA, they are simply a linear sequence of amino acid building blocks. In order to perform the function for which they were synthesized, the protein molecule needs to ‘fold’ or reorient itself into the requisite three-dimensional shape. An excellent discussion on the structure of proteins can be found here.

Proteins not only experience an external resistance to folding from the solvent they are present in (water, mostly), they also experience an ‘internal’ resistance to folding (like the rust in the umbrella). This ‘internal friction’ in polymer molecules is a key focus of my PhD research. [Protein folding, taken in its entirety, is a much larger question, and I do not work on the protein-folding problem.] The biological consequences of internal friction, especially in connection with the protein-folding problem, has begun to receive a lot of academic attention recently.

Now, proteins are just a type of polymer: long chain molecules that are composed of several repeating units. At a fine enough level of detail, the chemistry of these building blocks will begin to matter: there is a significant difference between the bond that joins a carbon atom to a hydrogen atom, and a nitrogen-hydrogen bond.

My research training involves the use of statistical mechanical principles, and a tool called Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations, wherein polymer molecules are modeled as beads connected by springs, without going into the finer chemical details of the molecule. Such a calculated and deliberate neglect of detail prevents us from answering certain questions about the polymer molecules (“what should be the shape of the drug molecule that binds specifically to site #27 of the molecule?”) but offers payback in terms of insight about specific universal properties of polymers. These universal properties could be biophysical or rheological in nature.

Total shear stress, τp,yx, as a function of the shear rate for various values of ϵ and h*. Error bars are smaller than the symbol size.

                                               Source: R. Kailasham, R. Chakrabarti, and J. R. Prakash, J. Chem. Phys. 149, 094903 (2018)

In a recent publication, we study the rheological response of a dilute polymer solution with internal friction.

As graduate research scholars of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, we study for a dually-badged PhD from IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich our research experience. The Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen relationships between the two countries. According to its CEO, Prof Murali Sastry, “The IITB-Monash Research Academy was conceived as a unique model for how two leading, globally focussed academic organisations can come together in the spirit of collaboration to deliver solutions and outcomes to grand challenge research questions facing industry and society.”

He was spot on. This project will firstly enhance our ability to understand mechanisms in biological systems such as the cellular environment. It will also contribute to enabling aspects of the Strategic Research Priority ‘Living in a changing environment’ and understanding the fundamental molecular aspects of Biodiversity—all of which is essential for harnessing biomolecular processes whether in health care or biotechnology.

Research scholar: Kailasham Ramalingam, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Theoretical and computational study of polymers in the semi-dilute regime in presence of shear flow, crowding and internal viscosity

Supervisors: Dr. Rajarshi Chakrabarti and Dr. Ravi Jagadeeshan

Contact details:kailasham29@gmail.com

 This story was written by Kailasham Ramalingam. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

 

Using an enzyme to battle the Big C


Cancer is arguably the biggest medical mystery the world is trying to solve today. And researchers like Debopriya Sadhukan from the IITB-Monash Research Academy are attempting to understand the chemistry of cancer, which will hopefully help design better drugs to beat this dreaded disease.

Debopriya’s project is titled ‘Understanding the reaction mechanism of C5-cytosine DNA methyl transferase’.

Possible sites for DNA methylation

“DNA methylation—a process by which methyl groups are added to the DNA molecule—plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis,” she explains, “for it controls gene expression and maintains genome integrity. In tumour cells the normal methylation pattern is disrupted by hypomethylation or region-specific hypermethylation. In such cells, the methylation pattern is controlled by the enzyme C5-cytosine DNA methyltransferase. But how the enzyme catalyses the reaction is still a mystery. We are therefore trying to understand the working mechanism of this enzyme.”

Some of the questions researchers in this field are grappling with are:

i) How is the cysteine residue de-protonated?
ii) What is the role of the Glu119 residue?
iii) What is the nature of the base that will abstract the proton from the 5-position of cytosine?

Says Debopriya, “We are trying to understand the reaction mechanism of this enzyme by a completely different approach so that we can give a much better and easier explanation of the mechanism. In mammals this methylation mostly occurs at the 5-position of cytosine, so our work is solely focused on the reaction mechanism of C5- cytosine DNA methyl transferase. We adopted a simple approach. If the deprotonation energy of the C5-H bond is equal to or less than the protonation energy of the base, then the base will be able to abstract the proton from the 5- position of cytosine. So, we calculated the deprotonation energy of the C5-H bond in the presence of different moieties of the active site and the protonation energy of different bases in both gas phase and in a solution. Though we have not yet been able to close in on a suitable base whose protonation energy is more than the deprotonation energy of the C5-H bond, we found that the difference in deprotonation energy and protonation energy decreases when one increases the dielectric constant of the solvent. This is encouraging!”

Scheme-1: General Reaction Mechanism for DNA Methylation

The IITB-Monash Research Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen scientific relationships between the two countries. Graduate research scholars like Debopriya study for a dually-badged PhD from both IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich their research experience.

Says Prof Murali Sastry, CEO of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, “Today’s research challenges require a strongly multi-disciplinary approach. And the way in which this Academy has been set up makes it possible for such multi-disciplinary investigations to be carried out. This gives me immense hope that our research scholars will create significant science, societal and industry impact in the future. According to data from the National Cancer Institute, there are 458.4 new cases of cancer per 100,000 men and women per year. What could be more gratifying than if the work by researchers like Debopriya can help reduce that number?”

Research scholar: Debopriya Sadhukan, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Understanding the reaction mechanism of C5-cytosine DNA methyl transferase.

Supervisors: Prof. G. Naresh Patwari, Dr. Ekaterina Pas

Contact details: oli.debopriya@gmail.com

The above story was written by Mr Krishna Warrier based on inputs from the research student, his supervisors, and IITB-Monash Research Academy. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

Improving coverage control laws for multi-robot systems


Consider the following applications:

  • Monitoring the temperature/current or oil spills in a part of the ocean.
  • Attempting to ascertain the presence of nuclear radiation in a particular region.
  • Deploying a network of unmanned (UAVs) in a reconnaissance mission to measure enemy presence in a region.

In each, there is a need to distribute autonomous agents functioning as sensors to optimally cover an unknown environment. Algorithm design for such agents usually faces two challenges. The first is location optimization — to resolve how the agents should be ideally distributed in order to achieve optimum sensing capabilities. The second, and more important, is to ascertain the requirements in communication in order to achieve the desired optimum coverage configuration in a robust manner (for instance intervals between messages, communication topology).

Rihab Abdul Razak, a research scholar with the IITB-Monash Research Academy, is working on a project titled, ‘New models and algorithms for decentralized and adaptive coverage control in multi-robot systems’ to help resolve these challenges.

He aims to study advances in decentralized coverage control. This is an important coordinated control problem wherein a set of robots identify optimal techniques to cover an unknown environment for the purpose of sensing.

Says Rihab, “The phenomenon to be sensed by the robots is described by a mathematical function over the region to be covered. Each robot is capable of measuring the value of the function at its position. Controllers for mobile robots have been developed so that the robots realign themselves in an optimal sensing configuration. The problem is solved by optimizing the locational optimization cost function with respect to the agent positions, and developing controllers for the robots so that they converge to the optimum of the cost function. The controllers are decentralized so that the controllers for each robot in the group work based on information local to the robot and do not require global information.”

Most of the work done in this field so far uses simple agent models to design controllers. “We aim to design controllers for more realistic agent models,” explains Rihab. “Also, we focus on adaptive algorithms where all the information about the environment may not be known, and the algorithms developed need to adapt to these unknown quantities.”

The Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen scientific relationships between the two countries. Graduate research scholars like Rihab study for a dually-badged PhD from both IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich their research experience.

Says Prof Murali Sastry, CEO of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, “Rihab’s work has wide-ranging applications, including rescue and recovery, radiation and nuclear spill detection, underwater oil exploration, etc. The goal is to improve existing coverage control laws.”

Research scholar: Rihab Abdul Razak, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: New models and algorithms for decentralized and adaptive coverage control in multi-robot systems

Supervisors: Dr. Srikant Sukumar, Dr. Hoam Chung

Contact details: tarihab@gmail.com

The above story was written by Mr Krishna Warrier based on inputs from the research student, his supervisors, and IITB-Monash Research Academy. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

Seeking a new material to monitor hydrogen


The demand for hydrogen on a commercial scale is growing rapidly. This colourless, highly combustible gas is not only a large industrial and laboratory commodity, but also has the potential to be used as fuel, and this could increase the demand to more than 2 trillion cubic metres per year. Therefore it is necessary to have a dedicated sensing system with low saturation, high sensitivity and affordability to measure hydrogen.

Arif Ibrahim, a research scholar with the IITB-Monash Research Academy, is hoping to develop precisely such a system as part of his project, ‘Nano-confined multi component metal hydride system for hydrogen sensing application’.

“Current measuring technologies use various principles — like Resistive, Optical, Bubble Testing, Catalytic Combustion, and Electrochemical,” says Arif. “We hope to come up with a thin-film-based hydrogen gas sensor using carbon-based material, which performs continuous monitoring with appropriate electronic arrangement.”

Hydrogen cannot be detected by human senses, making the use of suitable detection devices necessary. It is highly inflammable, and since hydrogen leaks can be hazardous if not detected quickly, reliable detection systems need to be tested, and their performance validated, so that they can be effectively deployed wherever hydrogen is produced, stored, distributed, or used.

Says Arif, “We have so far come up with a novel material that shows better response with pd dispersion into the matrix of that material and hydrogen gas can be sensed and continuously monitored with its lower limit by using any either resistive- or optical-based detection system. The biggest challenge is to get a proper thin film with thickness that lies under the 2D regime.”

The IITB-Monash Research Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen scientific relationships between the two countries. Graduate research scholars like Arif study for a dually-badged PhD from both IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich their research experience.

The image shows the detection principle in resistive as well as optical domain. In resistive sensing approach material is deposited on the top of conductive electrode i.e. gold, silver then sensing is done on the basis of change in resistivity with respect to exposure in the hydrogen rich environment. Similarly optical approaches are based on the change in the reflectivity of the material subjected to hydrogen gas

Says Prof Murali Sastry, CEO of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, “Hydrogen is not a primary energy source such as coal or gas but is an energy carrier (similar to electricity) and can store and deliver energy in a widely useable form. It is one of the most promising alternative fuels for future transport applications. When produced from renewable sources it provides pollution-free transport, without carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, and decreases our dependence on dwindling oil reserves. If Arif is able to develop a sensing system for hydrogen that’s reliable and robust, the scope is tremendous.”

Arif Ibrahim

Research scholar: Arif Ibrahim, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Nano-confined multi component metal hydride system for hydrogen sensing application

Supervisors: Prof. S P Duttagupta, Prof. A Sarkar, Prof. Sankara Sarma V Tatiparti, Prof. Raman Singh, Prof. Gita Pendharkar

Contact details: er.arifibrahim@gmail.com

The above story was written by Mr Krishna Warrier based on inputs from the research student, his supervisors, and IITB-Monash Research Academy. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

Graduation Ceremony 2018


 

Graduation celebrated at the highest level

Professor Margaret Gardner AO, President and Vice-Chancellor of Monash University was a special guest at the recent Institute of Technology-Bombay convocation (graduation) ceremony held on August 11th 2018 in Mumbai, India.The guest of honour for the convocation ceremony was the Honourable Mr Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India, who delivered an inspiring speech as well as three gold medals and 43 silver medals to students.

Joined by a Monash delegation of senior Monash staff, Professor Gardner witnessed the graduation of 29 PhD students from the IITB-Monash Research Academy joint venture program; five students from the program also received medals from the Prime Minister.  The Research Academy is celebrating its 10th year of operation in 2018 and this was the 6th cohort of students to graduate alongside their IITB peers.

Professor Gardner, Deputy Chancellor Shane Buggle and Provost and Senior Vice-President, Professor Marc Parlange formed part of the official academic and VIP procession that sat alongside Prime Minister Modi on the graduation stage as part of the formalities.The IITB-Monash Research Academy joint venture was established in 2008 in recognition of India’s status as an emerging research and global technological powerhouse. It is a collaboration between the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB) and Monash University.

The IITB-Monash Research Academy enables the formation of multi-disciplinary research teams across Australia and India, challenging the traditional individual/discipline-oriented research agenda. The Academy also enables the long-term engagement of industry commitments structured around major research challenges.

The Academy has successfully fostered deeper collaboration across the higher education sector. It has recruited 250 students, launched 420 joint collaborative projects and produced 600 research publications and Industry funded projects to the tune of $14M in committed contracts. The collaboration has also seen a 585% increase in co-publications from 2012 -2017.After the ceremony the Monash delegation hosted an ‘Alumni and Friends’ reception event in Mumbai. Guests included the newly graduated students, Monash and Academy staff and alumni and friends of Monash drawn from government and industry.

Speaking to the group about Monash’s strength in large scale cross-disciplinary research Professor Gardner said, “You can’t do projects of that scale unless you have excellent research. But you don’t do projects on that scale unless you’re prepared to take on big challenges and big challenges mean you have to work across disciplines.”

“…the challenges we’re prepared to put to ourselves (at Monash) are big challenges and we have the excellent people to take on those challenges,” she concluded.

Also speaking at the event was by Dr Murali Sastry, CEO IITB- Monash Research Academy. He joined Professor Gardner is congratulating the new graduates and in highlighting the importance of continued engagement in India. He also encouraged Monash University Alumni to connect with alumni from the Research Academy.

Tracking nanoparticle movement deep inside our lungs


Lung disease is the third leading cause of deaths worldwide, according to a study by the World Health Organization. The respiratory system is prone to numerous diseases like asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, and cancer. Many of these are caused by nanoparticles that deposit on the inner surfaces in our lungs.

• How does our breathing pattern affect the transport and deposition of these nanoparticles?
• Does our breathing rate during different activities like sleeping, running or walking have any significant effect on this?
• What are the differences in the breathing profiles of healthy persons and those with diseases?
• Can predicting nanoparticle movement in the lung help combat lung disease?

These are some of the questions that Chitresh Bhargava, a research scholar with the IITB-Monash Research Academy, is seeking answers to as part of his PhD project titled ‘Deep in the Lung: Nanoparticles transport and deposition in alveolar flows’.

“The transfer of desirable (drugs) or undesirable aerosols (pollutants) in the lung occurs with the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in small sacs known as alveoli (more than 300 million in number). Understanding the transport and deposition of such nanoparticles is of deep interest to me,” says Chitresh. “It enables us to study health effects — both from the point of view of potential risks due to pollutants and safety to pharmaceutical drug delivery.”

Previous studies suggest that factors such as the particle size and carrier airflow pattern determine the deposition fraction in regions such as nasal pharyngeal, bronchioles and alveoli. “It has been reported that a fine particle size (approximately 20 nm) has a deposition fraction of 90% in the alveoli”, which suggests that diffusion is the main mechanism of particle deposition. However, studies reveal that diffusion cannot be the only reason. Convective transport plays a vital role as well in the transport of particles along the conducting airways.”

During his research, Chitresh will simulate and analyze fluid flow and particle deposition in various complex alveolar models of the pulmonary tract through computational fluid dynamics (CFD). “In a series of studies, we will employ the CFD approach as it allows us to consider flows that are very difficult to model experimentally even for very small particles. However, CFD has not yet been used extensively to study alveolar deposition. Limitations such as failure to incorporate the accurate shape of the alveoli, expansion-contraction of the alveoli during breathing, and the impact of breathing rate on the transport and deposition of aerosols have influenced us to work on a more accurate method to track particles in the alveoli.”

Airflow simulation in an alveolated duct 3D model for Reynolds number 0.01. The streamline profile shows re-circulation of air in alveoli

The IITB-Monash Research Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen scientific relationships between the two countries. Graduate research scholars like Chitresh study for a dually-badged PhD from both IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich their research experience.

Says Prof Murali Sastry, CEO of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, “Extensive research is being conducted to ascertain new drugs and drug delivery systems for pulmonary delivery that are more efficient and safe. It is first important, though, to understand the mechanism of transport and deposition of the particulate matter in the human lung rather than directly switching to the drug delivery system for treatment of a number of diseases. Thus, the prediction of the particle deposition in the human pulmonary tract is of vital importance to evaluate the risks associated with exposure to air pollutants. We hope Chitresh’s research will lead to a novel understanding of transport and deposition mechanisms that occur in alveolar flows, which, in turn, will help us all breathe a little easier!”

 

Research scholar: Chitresh Kumar Bhargava, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Deep in the Lung: Nanoparticles transport and deposition in alveolar flows

Supervisors: Prof. Devang V. Khakhar, Prof. Murray Rudman and Dr. Guy Metcalfe

Contact details: chitreshbhargava29@gmail.com

The above story was written by Mr Krishna Warrier based on inputs from the research student, his supervisors, and IITB-Monash Research Academy. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

Making robotic surgeries more efficient and interactive


Aspiring surgeons find surgical simulators very helpful as a training tool. However, most of these simulators use simplified tool-tissue interaction because of the real-time feedback required. This problem can be overcome if finite models are developed.

Abhishek Mukherjee, a research scholar with the IITB-Monash Research Academy, is therefore working on a project titled ‘Modeling of the interaction of soft tissues and cells with their environment’.

It is well-documented that during surgery the tissue response is a function of force (applied by the surgeon), tool position, and the path taken by the surgeon. Abhishek is attempting to develop tool-tissue interaction models to predict feedback which could directly be fed to the haptic device if the simulations can be conducted in real time. And just in case real time computations are slow, realistic simulations could be carried out offline and fitted into meta-models, which could then be used for feedback from the haptic device.

“A part of my project deals with modeling the interaction between a robotic surgical tool and tissue to characterize the mechanical properties of the tissue. Through this, we may be able to detect the presence of a tumor embedded in it,” says Abhishek excitedly. “And then there’s the other part, where I plan to model stresses on cells when they migrate through 3D channels. This is likely to give us more insight into the physics behind such processes. Cancerous cells take more time to migrate than healthy ones, and thus might serve as a bio-indicator. Bio-mechanical interactions are complex because they cannot simply be analyzed from a mechanical standpoint — there are several biological processes involved too. I relish the possibility that I get to unravel some of nature’s best kept secrets by understanding how bio-mechanisms work. The model that we have developed could make robotic surgeries more efficient and interactive.”

A three-dimensional computational model of an indentation process to detect an embedded cancerous nodule. The colours indicate stress development in the system with red indicating high stress and blue low stress conditions.

The IITB-Monash Research Academy is a collaboration between India and Australia that endeavours to strengthen scientific relationships between the two countries. Graduate research scholars like Abhishek study for a dually-badged PhD from both IIT Bombay and Monash University, spending time at both institutions to enrich their research experience.

Says Prof Murali Sastry, CEO of the IITB-Monash Research Academy, “The first part of Abhishek’s project holds a lot of promise for efficient robotic surgery in that there is a major push to make robotic surgery more interactive and make robots ‘feel’. Unfortunately, mathematical models to do are still to be developed. Robotic surgeries are currently done based on distance estimation to the target organs, but incorporating a touch or force sensation would make the process more intuitive and interactive for the surgeons operating on it remotely. The second part of the project is important to understand the physical phenomenon behind cell migration through constricted spaces. This could give more insight into understanding the dislocation of cancer cells from their primary location to lodging themselves in a separate location to give rise to secondary tumors. Understanding these phenomena could go a long way in treating cancers.”

Abhishek Mukherjee

Research scholar: Abhishek Mukherjee, IITB-Monash Research Academy

Project title: Modeling of the interaction of soft tissues and cells with their environment

Supervisors: Prof Ramesh Singh, Prof Shamik Sen, Prof Abhishek Gupta, Prof Wenyi Yan

Contact details: abhmukh@gmail.com

 

The above story was written by Mr Krishna Warrier based on inputs from the research student, his supervisors, and IITB-Monash Research Academy. Copyright IITB-Monash Research Academy.

Excellence in PhD Research!


Message from Prof. Murali Sastry, CEO:

“It is a matter of immense pride that 5 of the Academy students have been selected for the “Excellence in PhD Research” Award and will receive this honour at the hands of the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi, during the Convocation on 11 August, 2018. They are :

  • Dr. Ramakrishna Bairi
  • Dr. Vignesh Kuduva
  • Dr. Jayesh Sonawane
  • Dr. Subhadeep Das
  • Dr. Jhumur Banerjee

On behalf of the entire IITB-Monash Research Academy, I’d like to congratulate all of the award winners and wish them the very best as they set out on their careers.