The 100th Ph.D. Graduate


We are delighted to announce that the IITB-Monash Research Academy now has 100 graduates, thus marking a significant milestone in the Academy’s 10-year journey.

Our Joint Ph.D. student, Vamshi Krishna Kammadanam, presented his defense seminar today (April 25, 2019), becoming the 100th research scholar from the Academy to do so. Present on the occasion were Prof. Subhasis Chaudhuri (Director, IIT Bombay), Prof. A.K.Suresh (Deputy Director, Academic & Infrastructural Affairs), Prof. Virendra Sule (Professor, IIT Bombay), Prof. Neela Nataraj (Academy Professor In-charge), Prof. Rushikesh Joshi (Professor, IIT Bombay), Prof. Bimal Roy (Professor, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata), Prof. Vikram Vishal (The Academy’s first graduate and now Professor, IIT Bombay).

Here is what they said.

Prof. Murali Sastry: 10 years, nearly 300 students through the Academy, close to 300 supervisors associated with us, 15 industry and government partners, two startups and now 100 graduates- how cool is this! We are extremely proud of our well-placed graduates who continue to build the IITB-Monash Research Academy brand globally.

Prof. Subhasis Chaudhuri: We have achieved the feat of 100 graduates. It is a great achievement not only for the Academy but also for both the partner institutes, IIT Bombay and Monash University. 10 years ago, when all this started, I don’t think we imagined that this joint Ph.D. program will take up the speed that it has today.

Prof. Neela Nataraj: The IITB-Monash Research Academy has reached a major milestone with 100 Ph.D. graduates and this special occasion marks 10 years of successful collaboration between IIT Bombay and Monash University, Melbourne. We hope that the graduates continue to do path-breaking research, build further on the training they received from IIT Bombay and Monash University and contribute both to the academia and the industry

Vamshi Krishna Kammadanam: Looking back at my decision to join PhD at IITB-Monash Academy, I can surely say that it has been a rewarding experience. I was a little dubious at the beginning of my PhD as I was coming back to academics after a break of four years during the course of which I was working as a senior engineer. But the support that I ended up receiving from people here at the Academy really made my journey as a research scholar quite smooth as well as enriching. Both the teaching faculty as well as the administrative staff at the Academy was very supportive and helpful. Regarding my research work, I am grateful that I got the opportunity to work under the guidance of two very experienced professors. I learnt a lot from them and had the good luck of receiving their expertise. Moreover, the Academy offers an intellectually stimulating learning atmosphere that was quite beneficial to me and led to my growth as a research scholar.

Vamshi Krishna Kammadanam’s Ph.D. Research:

He was jointly guided by Prof. Virendra Sule (IIT Bombay) and Prof. Yi Hong (Monash University)

Thesis Title: Symmetric and Asymmetric Schemes with Ideal Secrecy and Secure Transaction over Physical Channel

Abstract: Communication using networks has changed rapidly in the last half century. From telegraphic poles to satellite communications and personal communications, there have been breakthroughs in the technology and logistics of communication. In the present-day world, networking of communication is indispensable for transaction of information such as in online conferences, ATMs, mobile apps for services, etc. However all previous advancements in communication technology largely ignored the problem of security against intrusion disrupting network services and confidentiality of communication. Hence in modern day communication it is of utmost importance to address and solve the challenges arising from problems of communication with security and confidentiality.

The thesis considers problems of constructing schemes for symmetric key encryption, asymmetric key encryption as well as the problem of simultaneous encryption and encoding for communication of information over an insecure channel. The following schemes have been developed in the thesis. First, symmetric key encryption for bulk data and communication over public channels. Second, asymmetric (Public) key scheme for exchange of session keys. Third, a symmetric key block cipher algorithm which simultaneously encrypts and corrects channel errors. Fourth, conditions for feedback shift registers to generate permutations.

(Email: vkkam1@student.monash.edu)